TIM’s Memory Monday (No: 35)

One of the nice things about looking back at my past models is reminding myself of the things I learnt along the way, either in terms of scenery building or figure painting.  At the time this model taught me a lot and the techniques I employed were refined a little in future builds.  I am also reminded of the mistakes I made and how Imanaged to cover them up!

For those of you who might be interested a  link to Part 1 of this diorama can be found here.

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The Last Of The Mohicans – 28mm Diorama – Part 2

A succesful week, helped considerably by the stay in doors weather, which has seen the completion of this model and also of one of my outstanding WW1 vignettes, the subject of a separate post to follow this one.

Not a great deal to say on this one.  The fir trees were completed with a couple of applications of static grass, the water effects were applied but need to dry a little further and the figures were painted and fixed in position.

The figures are in my opinion nicely designed but they aren’t the greatest of castings and they lack the crispness of other models that I have painted.  As a consequence they aren’t the best but perhaps I’m just getting my excuses in early!

The last photo was taken with the Magua model placed behind this diorama (my brothers idea, credit where it’s due).  The idea was to see how dramatic, if at all, the backdrop would look.  I think  a combination of both bits of landscaping could make for an interesting diorama, I just need to get my head around what figures to use.  There is no rush however as right now I’ve got more than enough lined up!

Photo’s below.

TIM

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22 thoughts on “TIM’s Memory Monday (No: 35)

      1. Ah I see. You don’t want to lap yourself haha. Aw man that hurts my brain to think about. Good plan Re six months. Maybe you could offer up something else on Mondays for the time being. A conversational starter like “Miniature mindset” Could be letting us know what you’re currently working on, your ideas and concepts but then also ask us to share ours.

        Liked by 2 people

  1. Very nice TIM. You really did get it to look dramatic, like a movie-scene. Lovely landscape, with a stark contrast that fits it so well. I also enjoy the cloth especially the women’s dresses, you can feel the dynamic of fabric moving.

    “The figures are in my opinion nicely designed but they aren’t the greatest of castings and they lack the crispness of other models that I have painted. As a consequence they aren’t the best but perhaps I’m just getting my excuses in early!”

    No, it’s not your fault, Warlord’s castings are a mixed bag, you can hit jackpot or get the doofus (also always very much clean-up to do). But you did them pretty well. Were the women also part of the Mohicans-set?

    Liked by 3 people

  2. I like this one a lot (which is no surprise since the first one was amazing as well). Its neat seeing the two next two each other. I still am blown away by how you used height and space for both of these. It really adds to the mood of both pieces! I’d like to see you do some more native american or western pieces in the future as you seem to really have a knack for them!

    Liked by 2 people

      1. I hadn’t thought about that when I commented though I did some window shopping for Native American sculpts in 28mm between now and then and I noticed a similar thing. There aren’t a ton of options or variety out there unfortunately so I can understand exactly what you’re saying here. Can’t do more dioramas if there isn’t something inspirational to paint…

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Very nice – I remember this one, but I didn’t remember the last one, which you would have thought would stand out more (being all dramatic and that!).This has a nice, simple narrative element to it though which really works. Love the way the two dioramas fit together as well.

    Liked by 2 people

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